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Judge Orders Release Of D.C. Police Policies

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A judge has ordered the release of documents outlining D.C. Police policies.
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A judge has ordered the release of documents outlining D.C. Police policies.

A District of Columbia judge has ordered the release of documents related to police policies and procedures that the department tried to have concealed.

Superior Court Judge Judith Macaluso ordered that the documents be made public in a blistering ruling last week in which she accused police of making "transparently false'' statements in trying to prevent the release of the documents.

The documents were sought as part of a 2009 lawsuit from the Partnership for Civil Justice Fund, a non-profit organization.

Among the documents the judge ordered at least partially released is the department's planned response to an emergency at the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant in Maryland.

Spokespeople for the police department and attorney general's office did not immediately return messages seeking comment Thursday.

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