NPR : News

Pew Poll: Good And Bad News For Romney

The cacophony of hoots being directed at Mitt Romney Wednesday for his poor performances in Alabama and Mississippi primaries is somewhat curious, especially since it was the conventional wisdom as recently as last week that the Deep South was likely to be very tough going for him.

In fairness, Romney probably brought some of this on himself with his prediction of a win in Alabama. And some of the last polls did suggest he might be in a position to win. Still, both states were always iffy for Romney.

In any event, all is not gloom and doom for the on-again, off-again, on-again frontrunner for the Republican presidential nomination.

A new Pew Research poll indicates that Romney is once again the clear favorite nationally among Republicans and GOP-leaning independents for the nomination, leading Rick Santorum 33 to 24 percent in a poll that was in the field through Sunday.

That compares with a month ago when Santorum and Romney were in a statistical tie, with the former U.S. senator from Pennsylvania slightly ahead.

So that's the good news. The bad news is that a large percentage of voters surveyed by Pew, 59 percent, see Romney losing to President Obama while only 32 percent saw the former Massachusetts governor winning.

But at least Romney could boast that his numbers vis a vis Obama were better than Santorum's. The poll had 68 percent of respondents saying Obama would beat Santorum compared with 24 percent who said the former senator would win.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Long Before Burning Man, Zozobra Brought Fire And Redemption To The Desert

For decades, residents in Santa Fe, N.M., have gathered to burn a massive puppet — but only after stuffing it with symbols of their woes. It's a way to release the past year's sadness and start anew.
NPR

Sunday Sports: Baseball Season Stats

As the baseball season enters the homestretch, Mike Pesca, host of The Gist podcast shares obscure baseball stats and somewhat dubious accomplishments with NPR's Rachel Martin.
NPR

If The FCC Gets It Way, This App Could Change The Way You Watch TV And Save Dollars

Michel Martin chats with NPR's Washington correspondent Brian Naylor about the FCC's scheduled vote this week on a proposal that could one day save cable subscribers money.
NPR

If The FCC Gets It Way, This App Could Change The Way You Watch TV And Save Dollars

Michel Martin chats with NPR's Washington correspondent Brian Naylor about the FCC's scheduled vote this week on a proposal that could one day save cable subscribers money.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.