WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Accusations And Counter-Accusations At Alexandria Schools

Play associated audio
Alexandria School Superintendent Morton Sherman.
Louise Krafft / Alexandria Gazette
Alexandria School Superintendent Morton Sherman.  

Alexandria school superintendent Morton Sherman is fighting to keep his job in the wake of a scathing auditor's report.

An independent auditor's report released Friday afternoon concluded that the budget office at Alexandria City Public Schools suffered from what it called a "dysfunctional environment," with contracts being approved that hadn't been budgeted and School Board members provided with inaccurate information. Already two senior level officials have resigned, and Vice Mayor Kerry Donley says another head should roll.

"It's my opinion that the superintendent should resign," said Donley.

School Board Chairwoman Sheryl Gorsuch says she's disappointed in the vice mayor for speaking out in public rather than handling the issue in a closed executive session.

"I think he needs to remember how the School Board members handled their opinions last summer regarding the problems on the city side."

When two city employees were charged with embezzlement last year, Gorsuch says, School Board members stopped short of calling for resignations.


'Not Without My Daughter' Subject Grows Up, Tells Her Own Story

"Not Without My Daughter" told the story of an American mother and daughter fleeing Iran. Now that young girl is telling her own story in her memoir, "My Name is Mahtob."

Internet Food Culture Gives Rise To New 'Eatymology'

Internet food culture has brought us new words for nearly every gastronomical condition. The author of "Eatymology," parodist Josh Friedland, discusses "brogurt" with NPR's Rachel Martin.

Proposed Climate Change Rules At Odds With U.S. Opponents

President Obama says the U.S. must lead the charge to reduce burning of fossil fuels. But American lawmakers are divided on limiting carbon emissions and opponents say they'll challenge any new rules.

Payoffs For Prediction: Could Markets Help Identify Terrorism Risk?

In a terror prediction market, people would bet real money on the likelihood of attacks. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about whether such a market could predict — and deter — attacks.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.