25-Year-Old Sets Record As Iditarod's Youngest Winner | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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25-Year-Old Sets Record As Iditarod's Youngest Winner

There's a new record in the Iditarod: A 25 year old has become the youngest musher to win the approximately thousand-mile trans-Alaskan sled dog race.

Dallas Seavey slid into Nome, Alaska, at 7:29 p.m. yesterday with nine dogs, finishing the race in nine days, four hours, 29 minutes and 26 seconds.

"We went into this race with a dog team that I knew had the ability to win the Iditarod," Seavey said in a post-race press conference in Nome. "We spent most of the race building a monster – a dog team that couldn't be stopped."

Seavey is a third-generation Iditarod racer; his father, Mitch, won the race in 2004 and finished this year's race in seventh place, nine hours behind Dallas. Grandfather Dan Seavey, 74, is currently on the trail in 52nd place and is the only musher in this year's race who also competed in the first Iditarod in 1973.

Above you'll find some photos of this year's race, and be sure to check out our story last week about Scott Janssen, a mortician-slash-sled-dog racer who successfully gave one of his dogs "mouth to snout" CPR on the trail.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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