Sustainable Sushi: See The Video. But Don't Eat The Eel | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Sustainable Sushi: See The Video. But Don't Eat The Eel

Sushi seems like the perfect modern food: Light, healthful and available at seemingly every supermarket in the nation. But is it sustainable?

That's the question behind "The Story of Sushi," a new video that's been pulling a lot of clicks in the past week. Maybe that's because its adorable format, with tiny, handcrafted figures used to tell the tale, stands in stark contrast to its depressing message: Most of the sushi we snarf up is harvested using unsustainable methods.

The video is a marketing tool for Bamboo Sushi, a Portland, Ore., restaurant that bills itself as "the first certified, sustainable sushi restaurant in the world."

A claim like that is sure to get our journalistic antennae twitching here at The Salt. Bamboo Sushi is certainly not the only sushi joint that has gone sustainable in a big way. (Think Tataki in San Francisco and Mashiko in Seattle, for starters.)

And chefs who tend to cook fish before serving it are also working hard at sustainable sourcing. But claims of sustainability can be suspect, and it can be hard for restaurants to weigh conflicting standards from different sustainability organizations against supporting local fishing.

"I've been in the seafood business for 40 years," Jasper White, chef and partner of the Summer Shack restaurants, told the Boston Globe last week. "The whole thing about sustainability is that the more I learn, the more confused I get."

Still, the Bamboo Sushi folks do seem to be working with some of the big guns in seafood sustainability, including the Monterey Bay Aquarium and the Blue Ocean Institute.

And a quick glance at its menu reveals that Bamboo Sushi is steering away from some of the big no-nos in sustainable fishmongering, including farmed salmon, king crab, octopus, red snapper, bluefin tuna and eel. Instead, they're going for pole-caught maguro tuna and wild shrimp from the Gulf of Mexico.

Big-box stores like Costco and Trader Joe's are also trying to deliver on sustainable seafood, a pledge that should include the sushi counter as well.

But for those of us who eat our sushi from the neighborhood carryout, not from high-end restaurants, odds are that tasty raw fish comes with a less than palatable pedigree.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

In An Earthquake, History Fuels One Writer's Anxiety

An earthquake in Napa Valley this week brought back old fears for author Gustavo Arellano. In his anxiety he's revisiting the book A Crack in the Edge of the World.
NPR

Real Vanilla Isn't Plain. It Depends On (Dare We Say It) Terroir

There's no such thing as plain vanilla — at least if you're talking about beans from the vanilla orchid. Whether it's from Tahiti or Madagascar, vanilla can be creamy, spicy or even floral.
NPR

Legal Questions Loom As Obama Weighs Military Action In Syria

The Obama administration is considering whether to broaden its air campaign against the extremist group the Islamic State by striking targets in Syria.
NPR

An App Can Reveal When Withdrawal Tremors Are Real

You probably haven't thought about whether your phone could help diagnose alcohol withdrawal. Well, it can. An app for doctors measures tremors and may help tell if someone's faking it to get drugs.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.