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Redskins Players Describe Williams' 'Bounty System'

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Former Redskins defensive coordinator Gregg Williams is under investigation for a system that rewarded players for injuring opponents.
Nick Hall: http://www.flickr.com/photos/nhall/3539538566/
Former Redskins defensive coordinator Gregg Williams is under investigation for a system that rewarded players for injuring opponents.

Former Washington Redskins defensive coordinator Gregg Williams is meeting with top NFL brass today. The meeting comes as the league will reportedly open an investigation into claims he paid his players to injure members of opposing teams during games.

Williams was the Redskins defensive coordinator from 2004 to 2007. For the past three seasons, he filled the same role with the New Orleans Saints, and the NFL discovered he ran an illegal bounty program during that time. Players were paid for big hits, including those that knocked opposing players out of games.

Once that came to light, similar allegations were leveled against Williams during his time with the Redskins.

Former players over the weekend said they received money from Williams for big hits during their time with the Redskins, with former defensive end Phillip Daniels telling the Washington Post the most he received was $1,500 following a game in 2005 where he registered four sacks.He said the money came from fines the team collected from players who were late for meetings or practices.

It's unclear what punishment if any the Redskins would receive should the claims against Williams during his time with the team be proven true.

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