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Lottery For 2012 White House Easter Egg Roll

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President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama stand with the Easter Bunny at the White House Easter Egg Roll on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Monday, April 25, 2011.
AP Photo/Charles Dharapak
President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama stand with the Easter Bunny at the White House Easter Egg Roll on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Monday, April 25, 2011.

The lottery for tickets to the annual White House Easter Egg Roll is open until Monday, March 5.

Last year more than 30,000 people attended the events on the South Lawn, which included games, storytelling and a visit from the Easter Bunny.

The White House says the tradition of rolling Easter eggs on the lawn dates back to 1878, when local children would gather on the lawn near the Capitol and roll eggs. This year's Easter Egg Roll, for children 13 and younger, takes place April 9.

Entering the lottery is free of charge, as are the tickets for the winners.

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