WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Food Drive For Maryland's Hungry Enters 26th Year

Play associated audio
A food drive by 'Harvest for the Hungry' this week gives Maryland an easy way for residents to support the needy.
Armando Trull
A food drive by 'Harvest for the Hungry' this week gives Maryland an easy way for residents to support the needy.

Nearly half a million Marylanders face hunger every day, almost a third of them children. Beginning today, it could be a little easier to help them get a healthy meal.

At Safeway stores in Maryland this week, you may notice a stack of brown paper bags with a 'Harvest for the Hungry' label near the carts or by the checkout stands. Inside those bags is $10-worth of healthy food. Once you buy the bags, Safeway will deliver them to the United Way so they can be distributed to families in need.

The food drive has been going strong in Maryland for 26 years, and has fed millions of families in that span.

Buying the pre-made bags isn't the only way you can help. You can donate non-perishable food and either drop it off at the Safeway or leave it in a bag for your letter carrier to pick up. The U.S. Postal Service will do it for free in Maryland.

NPR

On Television, More Transgender Characters Come Into Focus

Now that it's more common to see gay characters on TV, is the medium turning to transgender people for fresh stories? NPR's Neda Ulaby looks at TV's crop of transgender and "gender fluid" characters.
NPR

Obama Gets A Taste Of Jiro's 'Dream' Sushi In Name Of Diplomacy

On the first leg of his Asian tour, the president stopped by the iconic sushi restaurant. David Gelb, who directed a documentary about the restaurant, says eating there is amazing and nerve-wracking.
NPR

Bob Dole Returns To Kansas For Gratitude Tour

The 90-year-old former GOP senator says it's an opportunity to meet with friends and thank voters who supported him during his decades-long career in state and national politics.
NPR

FCC To Propose Change To Net Neutrality Rules, Media Report

The FCC is expected to put out new Internet traffic rules that would let content providers negotiate for better service. NPR's Melissa Block talks with Wall Street Journal reporter Gautham Nagesh.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.