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Food Drive For Maryland's Hungry Enters 26th Year

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A food drive by 'Harvest for the Hungry' this week gives Maryland an easy way for residents to support the needy.
Armando Trull
A food drive by 'Harvest for the Hungry' this week gives Maryland an easy way for residents to support the needy.

Nearly half a million Marylanders face hunger every day, almost a third of them children. Beginning today, it could be a little easier to help them get a healthy meal.

At Safeway stores in Maryland this week, you may notice a stack of brown paper bags with a 'Harvest for the Hungry' label near the carts or by the checkout stands. Inside those bags is $10-worth of healthy food. Once you buy the bags, Safeway will deliver them to the United Way so they can be distributed to families in need.

The food drive has been going strong in Maryland for 26 years, and has fed millions of families in that span.

Buying the pre-made bags isn't the only way you can help. You can donate non-perishable food and either drop it off at the Safeway or leave it in a bag for your letter carrier to pick up. The U.S. Postal Service will do it for free in Maryland.


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