Bartlett Denies Backing So-Called 'Stache Act | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Bartlett Denies Backing So-Called 'Stache Act

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Roscoe Bartlett's facial hair has suddenly become an election issue.
S.K. Vemmer, U.S. Department of State via Flickr (http://www.flickr.com/photos/kabulpublicdiplomacy/5499341792/)
Roscoe Bartlett's facial hair has suddenly become an election issue.

A Republican congressman in the midst of a tough re-election fight is in a hairy situation over a proposal to give tax breaks to Americans with mustaches.

The American Mustache Institute claimed Tuesday that Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, R-Md., had lent his support to what it calls the 'Stache Act, according to the Associated Press. The group wants Congress to approve a tax deduction of up to $250 a year for facial hair grooming.

But Bartlett's office says that's not true. His chief of staff says in a statement that Bartlett is "pro-stache'' but doesn't think "Americans should pay for people's personal grooming decisions.''

At least one of Bartlett's Republican primary opponents is criticizing him over the issue. The longtime incumbent faces several challengers in the Sixth District, which was redrawn to include more Democratic voters.

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