Ron Paul Celebrates A Leap Day Birthday — His Wife's | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Ron Paul Celebrates A Leap Day Birthday — His Wife's

Ron Paul ignored the primaries in Arizona and Michigan Tuesday night and took his campaign to Virginia, where only he and Mitt Romney are on the March 6 ballot.

Paul teased a sometimes boisterous crowd at a Springfield banquet hall just a few miles outside of the nation's capital. "You're such a noisy bunch. What's going on here?" Paul joked. "I keep saying they're sound asleep in Washington. We have to be noisy so they hear us!"

The Texas congressman also introduced his wife of 55 years, Carol, who has a leap day birthday on Wednesday — Feb. 29. She received roses while the audience sang, "Happy Birthday."

Paul finished third in the Michigan primary with less than 12 percent of the vote, and fourth in Arizona, where he looked likely to finish with less than 10 percent of the vote. He barely acknowledged the contests in his speech.

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