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Protests Continue In Afghanistan Over Quran Burnings; Some Killed

"At least four people have been killed and 20 injured in Afghanistan after protests spread over the burning of copies of the Koran at a US airbase," the BBC writes. "One person was killed in Kabul, one in the eastern city of Jalalabad and two in Parwan province."

Tuesday, as we reported, U.S. Gen. John Allen apologized to the Afghan people for what he conceded was the improper disposal of some Islamic religious materials — including Qurans — by international forces at the Bagram Air Field north of Kabul. News of the burnings sparked protests outside the base yesterday, and demonstrations continued today. Allen said the burnings were inadvertent, have been stopped and will be investigated.

According to al-Jazeera:

"Hundreds of protesters have clashed with police and security forces in Afghanistan in a second day of angry demonstrations over reports that copies of the Quran were burnt at an airbase used by NATO and coalition troops. According to a Afghan government source who told Al Jazeera, five people have been killed during Wednesday's protests and 32 have been wounded, but no exact location was given."

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