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Brazen Alexandria Con Man Pleads Guilty

Man faces 40 years behind bars

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David Lee Parker of Alexandria was so prolific that he earned backhanded praise from U.S. attorneys.
David Lee Parker of Alexandria was so prolific that he earned backhanded praise from U.S. attorneys.

An Alexandria man is facing more than 40 years behind bars for a series of brazen fraudulent schemes that defrauded not just strangers, but his own family as well.

Prosecutors say David Lee Parker talked his girlfriend into handing over $90,000 to relieve him from an employment contract with the French government -- a deal that never existed. He opened fraudulent lines of credit using the names of his elderly grandmother and his teenage daughter. He misrepresented his background in intelligence to get a job that gave him access to computers at the National Security Administration. He even conned two investors into handing over $120,000 in a cooked up scheme to open a Hard Times Café in Europe.

"He's a good liar, able to forge documents that look very real to give people that calm assurance that they are dealing with somebody on the up and up," says Peter Carr, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney's office.

Parker entered a guilty plea yesterday, and he's scheduled for sentencing in May.


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