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Alleged Capitol Bomb Plotter Waives Hearings

The man who the FBI says plotted to bomb the Capitol has waived his right to a preliminary hearing.
Patrick Madden
The man who the FBI says plotted to bomb the Capitol has waived his right to a preliminary hearing.

A Virginia man charged with plotting a suicide bombing inside the U.S. Capitol has waived his rights to preliminary and detention hearings, according to the Associated Press.

Amine El Khalifi of Alexandria was arrested Friday and charged with attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction. On Wednesday afternoon, he was ordered held pending indictment.

Authorities say the 29-year-old discussed plans to attack an Alexandria office building and a synagogue with an undercover FBI operative he thought was a member of al-Qaida.

Later, El Khalifi allegedly volunteered to wear a suicide vest and to kill himself in a martyrdom operation at the Capitol. His arrest came after a lengthy FBI investigation.

Court documents say El Khalifi is a native of Morocco who has been living illegally in the U.S. for more than a decade.


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