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Prosecutors: Maryland Trooper Killed For Revenge

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This image made from surveillance video provided by Prince George's County Police shows Cyril Williams, background, in the slaying of off-duty Maryland state Trooper 1st Class Wesley W. Brown, right. The image is from the doorway of an Applebee's restaurant in Forestville, Md. on Thursday, June 10, 2010 where Brown was working as a security guard.
AP/Prince George's County Police
This image made from surveillance video provided by Prince George's County Police shows Cyril Williams, background, in the slaying of off-duty Maryland state Trooper 1st Class Wesley W. Brown, right. The image is from the doorway of an Applebee's restaurant in Forestville, Md. on Thursday, June 10, 2010 where Brown was working as a security guard.

The first full day of testimony in the trial of the man accused of killing a Maryland State trooper has just wrapped up.

Prosecutors say Cyril Cornelius Williams shot and killed Trooper 1st class Wesley Brown outside a popular restaurant back in June of 2010. In opening statements Monday, Deputy State's attorney Tara Hamilton told jurors that a vengeful Williams shot Trooper Brown after Brown and another officer asked Williams to leave the restaurant for being disorderly.

In testimony Tuesday, that second officer, Karl Peoples, told of how the defendant became agitated and tried to hit him when he was told to leave. Prosecutors say Williams later returned with a .45 automatic and shot Brown.

Late in the day, an eyewitness who was in the parking lot of the restaurant during the assault testified to hearing the shots shortly before ducking behind a car for cover. She told the jury when the shooting stopped, she raised her head and saw a man with his mouth covered, carrying a gun running from the scene. When asked by prosecutors if she could identify that man, in the courtroom, she looked around, hesitated, and said yes, nodding toward Williams.

The trial is expected to last one week.

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