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Republican Daniel Bongino Going After Maryland U.S. Senate Seat

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Republican U.S. Senate Candidate Daniel Bongino is far behind the incumbent in fundraising, but he's hoping to use popular anger with Congress to his advantage.
Matt Laslo
Republican U.S. Senate Candidate Daniel Bongino is far behind the incumbent in fundraising, but he's hoping to use popular anger with Congress to his advantage.

Daniel Bongino, a Republican U.S. Senate candidate in Maryland, came to the annual Conservative Political Action Conference to meet with grassroots conservatives, but he ended up spending most of his time talking to reporters. The relatively young and energetic former Secret Service agent is eager to talk. If he wins the GOP primary he'll square off with incumbent Ben Cardin who has millions of dollars in the bank.

Bongino has only raised hundreds of thousands of dollars, but he says being new to politics is an advantage this cycle.

"Folks are tired of establishmentarians, the incumbency disease, insulated bourgeoisies bureaucrats, I mean if there's ever been a throw the bums out attitude it's now," he says.

Bonjino is running on a message of fiscal conservatism. It's helped him attract more than a thousand volunteer foot soldiers. But Maryland is a blue state and overcoming the fundraising deficit will prove difficult.

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