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Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell Blasts Obama At CPAC

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Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell Addressed the Conservative
 Political Action Conference in D.C. On Friday Feb. 10, 2012.
WAMU Photo/Matt Laslo
Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell Addressed the Conservative Political Action Conference in D.C. On Friday Feb. 10, 2012.

Virginia Governor Bob McDonnell used his address at the Conservative Political Action Conference in D.C. to slam President Obama and plug his home state.

The governor tried to paint a stark contrast between himself and the president who he said is anti-business. McDonnell says he's helped create a business climate that has attracting companies to the state.

 "We want more people to come to Virginia," Gov. McDonnel said. "We want to tell that Virginia story around the country and around the world. And we' ve been very fortunate, a 6.2% unemployment rate, the lowest in the southeast, third lowest east of the Mississippi and so companies are coming to Virginia because they believe that we get it." 

Unlike the federal government, which owes more than fifteen trillion dollars to its debtors, McDonnell pointed out that he filled a four trillion dollar budget shortfall without raising taxes.

"Guess what? Fiscal conservative principles work," Gov. McDonnel said. "We had a $1 billion in surplus over the last two years. Those things work."

McDonnell also urged the crowd to support former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney in the GOP presidential primary, which drew some boos from this crowd of conservative activists.

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