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Cuccinelli Receives Award At CPAC

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Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli received an award this week during the annual Conservative Political Action Committee. Hundreds of conservatives from across the country honored Cuccinelli with a standing ovation for his work in challenging the nation's new health care law.

"It passed out of the House on the 21st, signed by the President on March 23, 2010 and about 34 minutes later, give or take, we filed suit in the U.S. District Court," he says.

Cuccinelli was given the Defender of the Constitution Award in part for his challenge of the health care law, but also for taking on the Environmental Protection Agency over its new green house gas rules.

"One month in we sued the EPA, which I've taken to calling the Employment Prevention Agency," Cuccinelli says.

Among these conservative activists, Cuccinelli's resume offers up a lot of red meat. But as speculation grows that he'll seek higher office in Virginia, many of what these conservatives applaud could prove to be impediments for a future campaign.

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