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Prince George's County Helps Residents With Pet Loss

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Cody was a Newshound.
Sharon Rae
Cody was a Newshound.

Anyone who has ever lost a pet knows the heartache that follows. A program in Prince George's County is helping family members deal with the loss.

Rodney Taylor is with the county's animal management division. He says his agency is partnering with Capital Caring in Prince George's County to put on a free pet loss grief workshop.

"These pets are members of your family," says Taylor. "So when you lose a member of your family you grieve." The hour-and-a-half sessions are run by a social worker.

"She requires you bring a pic of pet to your session, and her goal is to be able to get you to talk about your pet again with a smile," says Taylor.

Taylor says several issues are addressed in the sessions: "Exploring the meaning of your loss, learning to cope with your loss and understanding your grief."

Taylor says his agency hopes to offer the workshop every 2-3 months. The next session is scheduled for February 21st at the Animal Services Facility in Upper Marlboro.

Interested current and former pet owners can call 301-780-7201 to pre-register for the event.


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