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PepsiCo Says It Will Cut 8,700 Jobs Worldwide

PepsiCo, the maker of Pepsi soda and Doritos chips, said it will cut 8,700 jobs worldwide. That represents about 3 percent of its 300,000 person global work workforce.

The announcement also comes just after the company announced better-than-expected fourth-quarter earnings. The Financial Times reports that net income for the company rose 3 percent to $1.4 billion and revenues were up 11 percent to $20.1 billion.

The job cuts, reports the AP, were prompted to try and make up for the higher cost of ingredients and are expected to save the company $1.5 billion in the next three years.

The AP reports:

"At the same time it's making cuts, PepsiCo also is planning to invest in its business.

"PepsiCo plans to increase advertising and marketing behind its brands by $500 million to $600 million in 2012, with a particular focus on North America.

"It also plans to invest $100 million on in store racks, displays and coolers. Additionally, it plans to increase dividends and share buybacks in 2012 to return cash to shareholders."

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