WAMU 88.5 : News

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WAMU 88.5's Jerry Gray Dies At 78

Photo of Jerry Gray from the WAMU archives.
WAMU archives
Photo of Jerry Gray from the WAMU archives.

Jerry Gray, one of WAMU 88.5's most influential personalities, passed away Thursday.

Gray joined the WAMU 88.5 airwaves in 1971 after a career in country radio in the Washington area, both as an on-air host and news director. He left an indelible mark on the station's audience as the host of The Jerry Gray Show, mixing traditional bluegrass with contemporary bands during weekday afternoons for many years. He also hosted a popular weekend show that featured traditional country, cowboy tunes, and western swing.

Gray took a hiatus from the station to tend to personal matters, and eventually returned to the station's lineup where he remained until 2001.

Although Gray hadn't worked at the station for nearly a decade, he was still much beloved by former colleagues and listeners for his warm delivery, sense of humor, and knowledge and taste in his musical selections.

Gray resided in southern Virginia after leaving the station. He was 78.


Correction: Gray left the WAMU 88.5 in 2001. An earlier version of this story stated Gray left the station in 2002.

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