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CETUSA Banned From Bringing In Foreign Students

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After a five-month investigation, the U.S. State Department ruled that the Council for Educational Travel in the United States will no longer be allowed to bring foreign students into the United States on work visas.

The investigation focused on an incident in Hershey, Penn. last summer, where more than 400 students working at the famous chocolate factory staged a walkout, citing low pay and unfair working conditions.

Since CETUSA was the sponsor company for those students, the State Department found them in violation of the federal regulations requiring sponsor companies to closely monitor and protect foreign students. This news sparked immense concern from resort businesses that rely on the influx of foreign students to help meet the huge swell in population during the summer.

But Ocean City officials say the 1,500 students who have already been pre-screened and approved to come to Ocean City by CETUSA are now in the process of being transferred over to other sponsor companies, and they are hopeful that all the kids who want to come to Ocean City, will still be able to.

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