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Virginia Settles Disabled Housing Case With DOJ

State will close four of its institutions for developmentally disabled

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Virginia is closing four of its five homes for the developmentally and intellectually disabled and will instead provide services in local communities under a 10-year, $2 billion settlement.

The deal follows a three-year investigation by the Department of Justice that found Virginia violated federal law by needlessly warehousing disabled individuals in institutions instead of providing adequate community-based services. The settlement was filed this week with the United States Court in Richmond after nearly a year of negotiations with the Justice Department.

The deal calls for Virginia to provide nearly 4,200 waivers to pay for localized care, enhanced crisis management services, housing assistance and greater employment opportunities for those receiving treatment.

Virginia is one of five states that operates multiple state-run institutions for the intellectually and developmentally disabled. Most states began transitioning those services to the community decades ago. The settlement announced yesterday echoes similar DOJ decisions reached in recent years with Delaware and Georgia.

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