CIA Officer Charged With Leaking Classified Information | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

CIA Officer Charged With Leaking Classified Information

Play associated audio

A former CIA officer who told reporters he participated in the interrogation of terrorist Abu Zubaydah has been charged with leaking classified secrets about CIA operatives and other information to reporters.

John Kiriakou, 47, of Arlington stands accused of violating the Intelligence Identities Protection Act and the Espionage Act. He made his initial appearance in federal court in Alexandria this afternoon, where he was released on a $250,000 bond, but was also told to surrender his passport and limit his travel to the Washington metropolitan area.

Prosecutors launched the investigation after defense lawyers for Guantanamo detainees filed a classified legal brief in 2009 that included details that had never been provided by the government. Authorities concluded that Kiriakou had leaked the information to reporters, and that reporters had provided the information to the defense.

The charges also state that Kiriakou leaked information about the identity of another CIA officer who participated in Zubaydah's interrogation.

NPR

For More Local Turkeys To Hit Holiday Tables, You Need An Abattoir

Demand for locally raised birds is growing faster than small farms can keep pace with. One New England farmer is making a bold move to get more gobblers to the table.
NPR

For More Local Turkeys To Hit Holiday Tables, You Need An Abattoir

Demand for locally raised birds is growing faster than small farms can keep pace with. One New England farmer is making a bold move to get more gobblers to the table.
NPR

Obama: 'No Sympathy' For Those Destroying Ferguson

Saying he understands the frustrations of people who feel they're not treated fairly under the law, President Obama also said, "I have no sympathy at all for destroying your own communities."
NPR

Is Digital Learning More Cost-Effective? Maybe Not

Digital learning initiatives are spreading to schools across the country, but new research raises doubts about how well they work.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.