CIA Officer Charged With Leaking Classified Information | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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CIA Officer Charged With Leaking Classified Information

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A former CIA officer who told reporters he participated in the interrogation of terrorist Abu Zubaydah has been charged with leaking classified secrets about CIA operatives and other information to reporters.

John Kiriakou, 47, of Arlington stands accused of violating the Intelligence Identities Protection Act and the Espionage Act. He made his initial appearance in federal court in Alexandria this afternoon, where he was released on a $250,000 bond, but was also told to surrender his passport and limit his travel to the Washington metropolitan area.

Prosecutors launched the investigation after defense lawyers for Guantanamo detainees filed a classified legal brief in 2009 that included details that had never been provided by the government. Authorities concluded that Kiriakou had leaked the information to reporters, and that reporters had provided the information to the defense.

The charges also state that Kiriakou leaked information about the identity of another CIA officer who participated in Zubaydah's interrogation.

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