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Metro Workers Charged In Coin-Stealing Scheme

Tens of thousands alleged stolen

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Scott Pitocco: http://www.flickr.com/photos/lightsoutphotos/4331800230/

According to federal prosecutors, two Metro workers have been charged with stealing thousands of dollars in coins from malfunctioning fare machines.

Federal prosecutors allege 58-year-old Horace McDade, of Bowie, Md., and 54-year-old John V. Haile, of Woodbridge, Va., worked as a team to systematically pilfer from the transit agency's malfunctioning fare machines.

McDade is a revenue technician and Haile is a Metro police officer who allegedly provided security for the money transports.

Prosecutors say the investigation began after a source told authorities that Haile routinely pulled up to a store in Woodbridge with bags holding $500-worth of coins he would use to buy lottery tickets.

"Bank records obtained during the course of the investigation report Haile with significant unexplained cash deposit activity in excess of $150,000 since 2008," the affidavit says. Lottery records show Haile won $32,000 in 2011, and those records only count winning tickets of $600 or more.

Metro says both men have been suspended, and Officer John Haile is in the process of being fired.


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