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Veteran Job Fair Expo Underway In D.C.

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Patrick Madden

The Veterans Career Fair Expo is under way at the D.C. Convention Center. Hundreds of active-duty and veterans are there already, but there could be as many as 10,000 job-seekers by the end of the day.

"There are over 100 companies here and we have a little over 6,000 jobs available at the expo today between the private sector and the federal government," says Paula Pullen, a Veterans Affairs job coach. "And our job here as coaches is to make sure that veterans are up to par for whatever they need for that employment."

Even those who don't get a job from the job fair today can gain valuable knowledge, says Marine Staff Sergeant Jasmin Colon. "Knowing that the positions they held in the military they can still use it out there in the civilian workforce with government, companies, contractors and organizations that they may have already been familiar with while they were serving."

The fair is also showcasing the VA for Vets program that allows employers and veterans to go online to hire or be hired.

The fair continues until 7 p.m., so active-duty service members and veterans alike are encouraged to attend.

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