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Virginia Presidential Ballot Challenge Tossed

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A three-judge panel of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals unanimously agreed with a lower court that Texas Governor Rick Perry and three other candidates wishing to be placed on Virginia's Republican presidential primary ballot waited too long to challenge Virginia's ballot access law, rejecting their appeal.

Perry sued last month after failing to submit the 10,000 voter signatures required to get on the March 6 ballot. Newt Gingrich, Rick Santorum and Jon Huntsman also failed to qualify and joined the lawsuit. Only former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Texas Congressman Ron Paul qualified.

Lawyers for Perry and others argued that a provision allowing only Virginia residents to circulate candidate petitions was unconsitutional. A lower court judge agreed, but said that the candidates waited too long to make their challenge.

Virginia's Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli says in a statement he's pleased with the ruling and that Virginia's election process can move forward. He previously urged that the appeals court reject the suit.

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