Cuccinelli Urges Rejection Of Perry's Bid For Virginia Ballot | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Cuccinelli Urges Rejection Of Perry's Bid For Virginia Ballot

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Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli is urging a federal appeals court to reject a bid by Texas Gov. Rick Perry and three others to be added to the state's GOP presidential primary ballot, according to the Associated Press.

Perry sued after failing to submit the 10,000 voter signatures required to get on the ballot. Newt Gingrich, Rick Santorum and Jon Huntsman also failed to qualify and joined the lawsuit, and all four of them were told by a federal judge Friday that they would not be allowed on the ballot.

U.S. District Court Judge John Gibney said Friday that a provision allowing only Virginia residents to circulate candidate petitions is probably unconstitutional. But he ruled that plaintiffs waited too long to challenge the law. Perry appealed to the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. 

The attorney general argued in court papers filed Sunday that the constitutionally sound signature requirement, not the residency restriction, kept Perry off the ballot.

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