Judge Denies Four GOP Candidates For Virginia's Primary Ballot | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Judge Denies Four GOP Candidates For Virginia's Primary Ballot

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Republican leaders in Virginia are concerned over voter turnout following this week's decision by a federal judge.

U.S. District Judge John Gibney refused to add Texas Gov. Rick Perry and three other candidates to Virginia's Republican presidential primary ballot.

Following a four-hour hearing, Gibney said that if the candidates thought the law was unconstitutional they should have challenged it when they first began their campaigns in Virginia, rather than waiting until after they failed to qualify.

Perry sued last month after failing to get the 10,000 voter signatures required to get on the ballot. Newt Gingrich, Rick Santorum and Jon Huntsman also failed to qualify and later joined Perry's lawsuit, asking the judge to declare Virginia's ballot requirements unconstitutional.

Published reports claim state GOP chairman Pat Mullens is concerned that voter interest and turnout will drop with so many potential candidates missing from the ballot.

Only former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney and Texas Rep. Ron Paul have qualified for the primary, scheduled for March 6.

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