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N.H. Voters Reveal Late Choices And Decry 'Angry Birds' Volatility Of Race

As New Hampshire voters headed to the polls Tuesday, we spoke with several as they left polling places in Manchester and Bedford.

Dan Yarrington, who owns a series of game stores in Manchester, told us he voted for Ron Paul for his foreign policy stance and his philosophy on government spending.

"I've been watching all the debates, I've been watching all the candidates," Yarrington said. "I actually supported him in 2008, and it's nice to see that he's getting a little more traction this time around, actually being a serious contender. I'm really not satisfied with any of the other options, so that's why that made that decision easy."

Yarrington said Paul could play a serious part in the nomination process even if he is not ultimately the GOP nominee.

"You've seen all these other candidates that are like angry birds, as I describe them — they just go up and then down, and up and down. You've seen Ron Paul just steadily climbing. And the reason is that he's consistent, he's honest, he's truthful, and people appreciate what he says. And he's not flip-flopping back and forth or just saying what you want to hear. And that's one of the downsides of him, is that he tells the truth and sometimes the truth is kind of boring. We have to talk about fiscal policy," Yarrington said. Paul "has principles, he sticks by them."

We also ran into one voter who wrote in the name of President Obama on the GOP ballot. "I don't want no Republicans in there," said a retiree named George from Manchester. "After eight years of Cheney and Bush, that's enough to learn a lesson."

Bob Kruger, pastor of a church in Bedford, said he voted for Rick Santorum after watching Saturday night's debate and admiring the way Santorum fended off attacks from Ron Paul. Iran is big voting issue for Kruger.

"I think our next president is going to have to stare that right in the eyes," he said. "I'm not looking for bravado or anything like that, I just want somebody who's straight up and honest. None of the others are." Santorum, he said, "was quite convincing."

In Bedford, Pamela Richards said she voted for Mitt Romney. "I like somebody moderate, and I like somebody who could beat Barack Obama," said Richards, an independent voter who tends to vote Republican. "I try to have an open mind and not be on one side or the other."

Neal, a bartender from Manchester, told us he voted for Jon Huntsman. He, too, had just decided in the past few days. He wasn't sure Huntsman has a real chance of winning, he said, "but of all the options available to me, I'm happier with that one."

We'll see what the rest of the New Hampshire primary voters thought when polls close at 8 p.m. ET.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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