Cuccinelli-Bolling Relationship Gets Even More Complicated | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Cuccinelli-Bolling Relationship Gets Even More Complicated

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Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli gestures during a press conference after a hearing before the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals on a challenge to the federal health care reform act.
AP Photo/Steve Helber
Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli gestures during a press conference after a hearing before the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals on a challenge to the federal health care reform act.

Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli has announced his intentions to run for governor in 2013, but he'll have some competition for the Republican nomination from current Lt. Gov. Bill Bolling.

Cuccinelli currently finds himself in the somewhat strange position of defending his chief rival for the governor's seat in court. State Democrats are suing Lt. Gov. Bolling over how and when Bolling can cast tiebreaking votes in the evenly divided Virginia Senate. Cuccinelli says his office will argue Bolling's case enthusiastically.

"I think the position is unassailable, and we will defend that thing to the last and I think we'll win those going away," says Cuccinelli.

Bolling has expressed disappointment at Cuccinelli's decision to run for governor, and Cuccinelli says the two men have not talked personally in recent months.

Cuccinelli says he understands the Gov. Bob McDonnell's support for Bolling's candidacy, but the agreement between the Governor and his lieutenant is irrelevant to him.

"The Governor's keeping his word, and I expect that," says Cuccinelli. "The Governor's a man of his word, I wouldn't expect anything less. But no one else was in on that deal."

Cuccinelli says he won't start campaigning until much later this year. His focus now is on helping the Republican presidential nominee win Virginia.

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