NPR : News

Filed Under:

A Year After The Shooting, Tucson Looks Forward

Play associated audio

The people of Tucson, Ariz., are commemorating the one-year anniversary of the shooting that claimed six lives and left 13 people wounded, including Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-Ariz.). As NPR's Ted Robbins reports, community-wide events are scheduled all weekend:

Saturday is filled with upbeat activities – hikes, bike rides, art projects. The events are part of something called "Beyond Tucson," to focus on healthy minds and bodies through physical activities.

Sunday, the actual anniversary, will be more solemn. At 10:11 am, the time of the shooting, people across Tucson will ring bells in memory of the shooting victims. Following that will be an interfaith service, speeches honoring those who were lost, and a candelight vigil at the University of Arizona.

Giffords is expected to attend the vigil, along with her husband, retired astronaut Mark Kelly.

On Weekend Edition Saturday, Robbins spoke with many in Tucson who are trying to commemorate the anniversary without returning to the fear and horror of the day.

We'll have more from the memorials tomorrow. And there's extensive coverage, as you'd expect, from Tucson's Daily Star and the Phoenix-based Arizona Republic. Meanwhile, here's a look back at some of the events that followed.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

For Carl Phillips, Poetry Is Experience Transformed — Not Transcribed

Phillips' new collection is both raw and refined, drawing on intimate experience while shunning autobiography. "I become uncomfortable when people make an equation between author and poem," he says.
NPR

#NPRreads: Middle East Air Quality, Lead Poisoning, And Jell-O

Around the newsroom and around the world, here's what we're reading this week.
NPR

Donald Trump In 9 Quotes And 200 Seconds

Trump took his act on the road to Tennessee, where he thrilled a conservative audience with an off-the-cuff routine that bordered on stand-up comedy.
NPR

No More Standing By The Spigot: Messaging App Alerts Water Availability

A startup in India — where an aging, ad hoc system limits water availability — is using text messages to let people know when their faucets should work, so they don't waste hours awaiting the deluge.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.