As The Dust Settles, Digging Deeper Into Iowa's Results | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

As The Dust Settles, Digging Deeper Into Iowa's Results

The GOP candidates have left Iowa, but number crunchers are starting to dig deeper into the data behind Tuesday night's vote. The Washington Post has this post-game analysis tracking where each candidate's supporters live and how they stack up by age, income, religion and Tea Party affinity.

Our friends at Patchwork Nation and WNYC also broke down the vote by community type. As you can see in the interactive map below, Patchwork characterizes much of the state as "emptying nest" communities that are home to retirees and aging baby boomers. Rick Santorum largely won those areas, with 26 percent of the vote.

Mitt Romney generally did better in the "monied 'burbs" outside cities like Des Moines, where he led with 28 percent of the vote. He also did well in the diverse, fast-growing "boom towns." Unsurprisingly, Santorum led in the "evangelical epicenters."

Newt Gingrich showed strength in the "service worker centers" — midsize and small towns where people work in hotels, stores and restaurants. Ron Paul showed strength in the "campus and careers" areas near college towns.

Mouse over the map to check out the vote breakdown in the rest of the state.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

'Welcome To Braggsville' Isn't Quite 'Invisible Man,' But It's Close

T. Geronimo Johnson's latest follows four Berkeley students who take an American history class that leads to disaster. It's an ambitious book about race that wants to say something big about America.
NPR

Why Shark Finning Bans Aren't Keeping Sharks Off The Plate (Yet)

Fewer shark fins are being imported into Hong Kong, the epicenter of shark-fin soup, a culinary delicacy. But while the trade in shark fins may be down, the trade in shark meat is still going strong.
WAMU 88.5

Mixed Grades For Virginia's Ethics Overhual

The last-minute compromise was designed to pass in the General Assembly, but it wasn't built to please everybody.

NPR

Internet Memes And 'The Right To Be Forgotten'

Becoming Internet-famous is a gold mine for some, a nightmare for others. The world of memes can pit free speech against the desire for privacy. And laws generally aren't keeping up, an expert says.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.