NPR : News

As The Dust Settles, Digging Deeper Into Iowa's Results

The GOP candidates have left Iowa, but number crunchers are starting to dig deeper into the data behind Tuesday night's vote. The Washington Post has this post-game analysis tracking where each candidate's supporters live and how they stack up by age, income, religion and Tea Party affinity.

Our friends at Patchwork Nation and WNYC also broke down the vote by community type. As you can see in the interactive map below, Patchwork characterizes much of the state as "emptying nest" communities that are home to retirees and aging baby boomers. Rick Santorum largely won those areas, with 26 percent of the vote.

Mitt Romney generally did better in the "monied 'burbs" outside cities like Des Moines, where he led with 28 percent of the vote. He also did well in the diverse, fast-growing "boom towns." Unsurprisingly, Santorum led in the "evangelical epicenters."

Newt Gingrich showed strength in the "service worker centers" — midsize and small towns where people work in hotels, stores and restaurants. Ron Paul showed strength in the "campus and careers" areas near college towns.

Mouse over the map to check out the vote breakdown in the rest of the state.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

National Museum of African American History Opens Its Doors

More than 100 years after it was originally proposed, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture is opening its doors in Washington, D.C.
NPR

While Everyone Was Partying At Woodstock, I Was Stuck At Schrafft's

The chain restaurant that catered to women helped redefine how Americans eat, according to a new book. For NPR's Lynn Neary, it also defined how she did and didn't fit with the counterculture.
NPR

Newspaper Endorsements Matter Most When They're Unexpected

The New York Times endorsed Hillary Clinton on Saturday, but an endorsement that came the day before from a smaller paper may matter more to its readers, for the simple fact that it was unexpected.
NPR

As Our Jobs Are Automated, Some Say We'll Need A Guaranteed Basic Income

How will the economy provide economic opportunities if employers need fewer workers in the future? A growing number of people in Silicon Valley are saying the only realistic answer is a basic income.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.