Virginia Primary Could Carry More Weight After Iowa | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Virginia Primary Could Carry More Weight After Iowa

Romney, Paul remain the only candidates eligible for Virginia ballot

Play associated audio

In the wake of the Iowa caucus, attention now moves down the road to contests such as Virginia's -- but many candidates are still jockeying to get on the state' s primary ballot.

After the close call in Iowa for Mitt Romney -- who ultimately prevailed by just eight votes in the state's caucus -- many candidates say the race in southern states, such as Virginia, became all the more important. But as of now, only former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney and Texas Congressman Ron Paul are on the state's ballot.

Some of the voters in Iowa yesterday seemed to agree that Virginia will be a key primary. Mike McInerney, a student at Iowa's Drake University who attended a local caucus, says it' s vital for southern candidates, such as former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich, to battle it out in Virginia. 

"It's important, not only for him, but for the other candidates, to get on, and obviously when only two candidates make the ballot there's a flaw there in the way that system works," says McInerney. "And hopefully they can get that reversed and have it reevaluated. Because it's simply, just kind of outrageous the fact that four out of the six or seven didn't make it to the ballot."

Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli last week said he would push to change the rules to allow the others on the ballot, but later backed off that position, saying a change helping wouldn't be fair to Romney and Paul, who followed the rules as they had been established. 

And if the Iowa contest is any indication, the race for Virginia will include lots of negative ads from outside groups, according to Bill Allison of the watchdog group the Sunlight Foundation. 

"I think we're going to see this as long as the primaries go on and as long as the winner is in doubt, there's going to be this flood of money," Allison says. "And we're going to see the same thing in the general election too, and it's going to be beyond anything we've ever seen before."  

But Rich Carstensen of Council Bluffs, Iowa says the negative ads are just a part of politics.

"It happens on every election. You know every candidate complains about the other one," Carstensen says. "It's just kind of part of the process. Who do you believe? You just need to have some discernment and make your own judgment."

The Virginia contest is set for March 6. 

NPR

If Robots 'Speak,' Will We Listen? Novel Imagines A Future Changed By AI

As artificial intelligence alters human connection, Louisa Hall's characters wrestle with whether machines can truly feel. Some "feel they have to stand up for a robot's right to exist," Hall says.
NPR

Aphrodisiacs Can Spark Sexual Imagination, But Probably Not Libido

Going on a picnic with someone special? Make sure to pack watermelon, a food that lore says is an aphrodisiac. No food is actually scientifically linked to desire, but here's how some got that rep.
NPR

A Reopened Embassy In Havana Could Be A Boon For U.S. Businesses

When the U.S. reopens its embassy in Havana, it will increase its staff. That should mean more help for American businesses hoping to gain a foothold on the Communist island.
NPR

In A Twist, Tech Companies Are Outsourcing Computer Work To ... Humans

A new trend is sweeping the tech world: hiring real people. NPR's Arun Rath talks to Wired reporter Julia Greenberg about why tech giants are learning to trust human instinct instead of algorithms.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.