Boeing Says It Will Close Wichita Plant That Employs 2,160 Workers | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Boeing Says It Will Close Wichita Plant That Employs 2,160 Workers

Boeing Co. says it will shut down its Wichita facility, which specializes in maintaining and modifying the company's planes for military or government use. The plant is slated to close by the end of 2013.

The closure could devastate a portion of the local economy, according to The Wichita Eagle:

"Closing the facility will affect 2,160 workers in Wichita, and provide a huge economic blow to the city, surrounding communities and the state. Boeing has been part of the community for more than 80 years."

The closure was announced at a meeting of all employees at the Boeing Defense, Space & Security facility in Wichita, months after Boeing officials said that Pentagon budget cuts may threaten the plant.

"In this time of defense budget reductions, as well as shifting customer priorities, Boeing has decided to close its operations in Wichita to reduce costs, increase efficiencies, and drive competitiveness," said Mark Bass, a Boeing vice president, in a company statement.

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