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Johns Hopkins Professors Create 'Permanent' Calendar

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A 2012 calendar
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A 2012 calendar

Two professors from Johns Hopkins  are proposing a new calendar in which dates would fall on the same days of the week every year.

The so-called "permanent calendar," proposed by Richard Conn Henry, an astrophysicist, and Steve Hanke, an applied economist, begins each year on Sunday, Jan. 1.

Both men also propose that January, February, April, May, July, August, October and November should be 30 days long. March, June, September and December would be 31. To bring the calendar into sync with the seasons, December gains an extra week every five years.

The professors, who also advocate "Universal Time" over time zones, say the new calendar would simplify planning and financial market calculations. They hope to take their proposal to the United Nations and promote worldwide interest.

NPR

'We're Mostly Republicans': New Hampshire Voters Explained By 'Our Town'

After NPR's Bob Mondello used The Music Man to help explain the Iowa caucuses, he wished there was a musical of Our Town so he could do the same for New Hampshire. It turns out there is one.
NPR

Chipotle Closes Restaurants To Hold Meetings On Food Safety

Chipotle held food safety meetings on Monday in all its restaurants. Stores won't be open for lunch but will be later in the afternoon. Managers will review new protocols designed to prevent the outbreak of food-borne illnesses. More than 500 people got sick last year after eating at a Chipotle.
NPR

'We're Mostly Republicans': New Hampshire Voters Explained By 'Our Town'

After NPR's Bob Mondello used The Music Man to help explain the Iowa caucuses, he wished there was a musical of Our Town so he could do the same for New Hampshire. It turns out there is one.
NPR

Infomagical: WNYC's 'Note To Self' Tries To Make Information Overload Disappear

NPR's Ari Shapiro checks in with Manoush Zomorodi of WNYC's podcast, "Note To Self," about their "infomagical" challenge. They're trying to mediate the problem of information overload and have some results to share.

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