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Johns Hopkins Professors Create 'Permanent' Calendar

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A 2012 calendar
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A 2012 calendar

Two professors from Johns Hopkins  are proposing a new calendar in which dates would fall on the same days of the week every year.

The so-called "permanent calendar," proposed by Richard Conn Henry, an astrophysicist, and Steve Hanke, an applied economist, begins each year on Sunday, Jan. 1.

Both men also propose that January, February, April, May, July, August, October and November should be 30 days long. March, June, September and December would be 31. To bring the calendar into sync with the seasons, December gains an extra week every five years.

The professors, who also advocate "Universal Time" over time zones, say the new calendar would simplify planning and financial market calculations. They hope to take their proposal to the United Nations and promote worldwide interest.

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