Report: School Suspensions Show Racial Disparities | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Report: School Suspensions Show Racial Disparities

Play associated audio
http://www.flickr.com/photos/dcjohn/74907741/

A new report shows black students in the D.C. area are suspended and expelled two to five times as often as white students. The trend can be seen in both the Maryland and Virginia suburbs and inner city Washington.

In a Washington Post analysis, researchers found that in the suburbs alone, more than 35,000 students were suspended or expelled from school at some point last school year -- more than half of them black students.

Experts say potential reasons for the disparity are poverty, unintended bias, unequal access to effective teachers and differences in school leadership.

In Montgomery County, Maryland, school leaders say they are trying new approaches to close the gap, including involving a team of administrators in suspension decisions.

In Prince George's County, Maryland, where a majority of students are black, school officials say they are working to reduce suspensions overall.

In Fairfax County, Virginia, officials say the county is looking into disparities to determine which schools and offenses produce the greatest gaps.

Next month, the District will begin a formal audit to understand more about how and why suspensions occur.

NPR

'Language Of Food' Reveals Mysteries Of Menu Words And Ketchup

Linguist Dan Jurafsky uncovers the fishy origins of ketchup and how it forces us to rethink global history. He also teaches us how to read a menu to figure out how much a restaurant may charge.
NPR

'Language Of Food' Reveals Mysteries Of Menu Words And Ketchup

Linguist Dan Jurafsky uncovers the fishy origins of ketchup and how it forces us to rethink global history. He also teaches us how to read a menu to figure out how much a restaurant may charge.
NPR

Obama To Announce Large Ramp Up Of Ebola Fight

The U.S. military plans to establish a medical base in Liberia to help stop the Ebola epidemic. It will build 1,700 new treatment beds and train up to 500 health care workers every week.
NPR

Smartphones Are Used To Stalk, Control Domestic Abuse Victims

Cyberstalking has transformed domestic abuse in the U.S. Tracking tools called spyware make it cheap and easy for someone to monitor a partner secretly, 24 hours a day.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.