Across Iowa, Gingrich Highlights His Experience As Poll Numbers Slip | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

Across Iowa, Gingrich Highlights His Experience As Poll Numbers Slip

Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich started Thursday's Iowa campaigning with a stop in Sioux City at The Coffee Works. Only about a dozen customers were there, but he was questioned critically by one about his comments on reforming the federal judiciary.

Linda Santi told Gingrich she didn't appreciate him "politicizing" the Iowa Supreme Court's 2009 decision that found unconstitutional a state law banning gay marriage. Santi said the decision was in accordance with the state constitution. Gingrich ended the conversation with: "We'll have to agree to disagree."

Across Iowa, Gingrich has been stressing his economic experience, calling himself a "supply-side conservative" who worked with Ronald Reagan in the 1980's and again as House speaker in the 1990's to revive the economy.

He keeps telling audiences how thrilled he is to campaign with economist Arthur Laffer, although it's not clear how many in his audiences have any idea who Laffer is (he's a former adviser to President Reagan who has an economic theory — the "Laffer Curve" — to his name).

Speaking to reporters Thursday, Gingrich said he's "totally focused on Iowa" and not thinking about the ensuing primary in New Hampshire.

Gingrich said if he finishes fourth in Iowa, he's definitely continuing his campaign.

A Time/CNN poll out on Wednesday showed Gingrich down to 14 percent support among likely Republican caucus-goers in Iowa, a state he once lead, trailing Romney, Texas Rep. Ron Paul and now even former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum.

Also Wednesday, Gingrich's campaign announced a $500,000 ad buy for the closing week in Iowa. But the fact remains that Gingrich has been outspent and is trying to regain his momentum one campaign event at a time.

On Thursday, Gingrich was continuing his bus tour of the state with stops scheduled in Storm Lake, Denison and Carroll.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

If Robots 'Speak,' Will We Listen? Novel Imagines A Future Changed By AI

As artificial intelligence alters human connection, Louisa Hall's characters wrestle with whether machines can truly feel. Some "feel they have to stand up for a robot's right to exist," Hall says.
NPR

Aphrodisiacs Can Spark Sexual Imagination, But Probably Not Libido

Going on a picnic with someone special? Make sure to pack watermelon, a food that lore says is an aphrodisiac. No food is actually scientifically linked to desire, but here's how some got that rep.
NPR

A Reopened Embassy In Havana Could Be A Boon For U.S. Businesses

When the U.S. reopens its embassy in Havana, it will increase its staff. That should mean more help for American businesses hoping to gain a foothold on the Communist island.
NPR

In A Twist, Tech Companies Are Outsourcing Computer Work To ... Humans

A new trend is sweeping the tech world: hiring real people. NPR's Arun Rath talks to Wired reporter Julia Greenberg about why tech giants are learning to trust human instinct instead of algorithms.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.