D.C. Residents Push New Site For WWI Memorial | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

D.C. Residents Push New Site For WWI Memorial

Play associated audio
The D.C. War Memorial is located on the National Mall, in a grove of trees between the WWII and Korean War memorials. Restoration was completed in November.
Rebecca Sheir
The D.C. War Memorial is located on the National Mall, in a grove of trees between the WWII and Korean War memorials. Restoration was completed in November.

Some people in Washington want a new site for a possible national World War I memorial, far away from the District.

The Association of the Oldest Inhabitants of the District of Columbia suggests Pershing Park on Pennsylvania Avenue as a place for the memorial. According to the Associated Press, members are concerned about the possibility of the District's World War I memorial being co-opted as a national memorial.

The War to End All Wars is the only major 20th-century conflict that does not have a memorial in the nation's capital. There is a memorial on the National Mall to D.C. residents who fought, and a bill before Congress would designate the District's memorial as a national memorial.

William Brown, president of the association, says the district's memorial was built with local money and should continue to honor local residents.

NPR

Fashion Designer Oscar De La Renta Dies

Oscar de la Renta died at the age of 82 on Monday. Steve Inskeep talks to Washington Post fashion critic Robin Givhan about the designer's legacy.
NPR

Sandwich Monday: The Primanti Bros. Pitts-burger

For this week's Sandwich Monday, we try a sandwich from the famous Primanti Bros. of Pittsburgh.
NPR

After Narrow Loss In 2012, GOP's Mia Love Finds New Strength In Utah

Mia Love is running again in Utah's 4th Congressional District after losing to Democrat Jim Matheson in 2012. Now front-runner, she could become the first black female Republican elected to Congress.
NPR

Tunisia's Emerging Tech Sector Hampered By Old Policies

When Tunisia's young people protested in 2011, they had one key demand: jobs. Now, despite new political leadership, that demand remains unmet — even in tech, the sector that offers the most promise.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.