NPR : News

Filed Under:

Because Of Somali Pirates, Ocean Racers Are In A 'Stealth Zone'

The six-boat, nine-month-long, 39,000-mile Volvo Ocean Race that started in Spain two months ago and is set to end in Ireland next July, has entered its "stealth zone" — an area off the coast of Somalia where the teams' progress will not be precisely broadcast to the world because of the threat in that part of the Indian Ocean from pirates.

"Boat tracks and data will be hidden from the public once they reach a certain point in the Indian Ocean," the race's organizers say on their "race tracker" page.

Right now, for instance, the site shows that the Groupama Sailing Team is in the lead, but gives no information about its location in that stealth zone — which covers "an area ... from the northern tip of Madagascar to the United Arab Emirates."

And the racers are heading "towards a safe haven port, where they will be loaded onto a ship for transportation through the worst affected waters and on to a point off the Sharjah coast, where they will resume racing to Abu Dhabi," the race website says.

There's more about the reasons in this video.

(H/T to NPR's Scott Neuman.)

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Writer James Alan McPherson, Winner Of Pulitzer, MacArthur And Guggenheim, Dies At 72

McPherson, the first African-American to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has died at 72. His work explored the intersection of white and black lives with deftness, subtlety and wry humor.
NPR

QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About Presidents And Food?

It's week two of the party conventions, and all these speeches are making us hungry. So we made a quiz to test your savvy about presidents and our favorite topic, food.
WAMU 88.5

Your Turn: Ronald Reagan's Shooter, Freddie Gray Verdicts And More

Have opinions about the Democratic National Convention, or the verdicts from the Freddie Gray cases? It's your turn to talk.

NPR

Police Use Fingertip Replicas To Unlock A Murder Victim's Phone

Michigan State University engineers tried 3-D-printed fingertips and special conductive replicas of the victim's fingerprints to crack the biometric lock on his Samsung Galaxy phone.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.