NPR : News

5 Things You May Not Know About Jon Huntsman

He is former governor of Utah and the namesake of a very rich man. His father, a Salt Lake City bazillionaire, owns a chemical company that really blossomed when it created packaging for McDonald's Big Macs. His father also served in the Nixon administration, so Jon Huntsman Jr. lived in Washington as a young boy.

It's no secret that Huntsman grew up in the Mormon Church and served his two-year missionary stint in Taiwan, where he learned to speak Mandarin Chinese and Taiwanese Hokkien. He also did stretches as a civil servant for several presidents, then in 2004 was elected Utah's governor. In 2009, President Obama appointed him ambassador to China.

He rides a Harley-Davidson and likes tacos. He and his wife, Mary Kaye, have seven children, including Asha Bharati, adopted from India, and Gracie Mei, who had been abandoned in a Chinese vegetable market. Three of the Huntsman daughters — Mary Anne, Liddy and Abby — are using Twitter in creative, sometimes edgy ways to promote their father's candidacy.

But here are a few more things you may not know about Jon Huntsman:

1. He was a musical theater prodigy. "I have sung the part of Oliver and Tiny Tim in church," Huntsman wrote in his resume when he was 15 years old and working at Mikado in Salt Lake City. At the Japanese restaurant, Huntsman toiled away as a dishwasher, prep cook and busboy. (Huntsman tweeted that someone scrounged up his curriculum vitae from the mid-1970s.) He also worked as a stonemason in the summer of 1974, was on his school's track and basketball teams, and enjoyed music, singing, tennis, swimming, skiing, motocross and camping.

2. He dropped out of high school — but he did graduate from college. In 1978, Huntsman quit school to play keyboards in the rock band Wizard. Eventually he was able to take classes at the University of Utah "after proving himself academically," according to his campaign website. He graduated from the University of Pennsylvania. He still tickles the ivories occasionally and tweets about his love of Captain Beefheart.

3. He has said he doesn't like campaigning. When President George H.W. Bush was defeated, according to a 1994 Forbes story, many people thought that Huntsman, then U.S. ambassador to Singapore, would go back to Utah and run for Congress. But Huntsman said he wasn't interested. "A commuter lifestyle didn't appeal to me," he told the magazine. "Nor did the campaign process."

4. He is respectful of China. In 1996, Huntsman, then a vice president of his father's multimillion-dollar chemical corporation, gave readers of Plastic News some advice about how to deal with China. "I'm aghast at the number of people who go there without any guidance," Huntsman said. "You need to hear both sides of China, both good and bad, particularly if you don't have a lot of resources. Consultation on the front end will save a lot of dyspepsia on the back end."

5. He once found a flak jacket under his Christmas tree. In 2005, then-Gov. Huntsman and his wife, Mary Kaye, asked the spouses of the Utah National Guard to adorn the Christmas tree in the governor's mansion. Decorations included framed photos of fallen military service members, a pair of boots still sandy from the Iraqi desert, a helmet and a flak jacket. "We could have had Santa Claus," Huntsman told The New York Times. "But to us, this was the most poignant way to celebrate the meaning of Christmas: a time of service, sacrifice and peace."

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit


Actress Niecy Nash Is 'Getting On' Just Fine

Perhaps best known for her work on Reno 911, Nash talks to Fresh Air contributor Anna Sale about playing a nurse on HBO's Getting On, a series about an extended care facility for elderly women.

Don't Get Salty: High-Sodium Warnings Hit New York City Menus

The city is the first in the nation to require a sodium warning on menu items containing 2,300 milligrams of sodium or more. The rule applies to chain restaurants with 15 or more locations.

Paris Climate Talks Face A Familiar Hurdle — American Politics

The U.S. and China are the world's two largest polluters, but in both countries, the will to do something about climate change is lower than the rest of the world. In the U.S., there's a party split.
WAMU 88.5

Computer Guys And Gal

Another year is coming to a close and the Computer Guys And Gal are here to discuss this year's biggest technology news, including the growth of virtual reality and the "Internet of Things."

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.