Occupy DC Inspires Protesters Across U.S. | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Occupy DC Inspires Protesters Across U.S.

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Occupy DC protestors demonstrated outside the Wikileaks trial of Army Pfc Bradley Manning this weekend, saying they're in it for the long haul, and their determination is motivating other protesters from across the country.

Jonathan Friedman came to D.C. this week and says he drew inspiration from what he saw.

"It's amazing," he says. "I came here to Occupy DC and it was great to see an actual camp. Because you know, in New York City we got evicted and we haven't been able to set up another camp."

Michael Patterson is a part of the Occupy DC movement. He spent three years in the army, but now he's fed up with the government and says he's not leaving the camp in McPherson Square until he gets arrested.

"The Democrats and the Republicans are both the same," Patterson says. "They're both corrupt and they're both capitalists, so it's not going to work."

While the protests are frustrating police and some elected officials, Occupy DC protestors say they don't plan to leave even as the snow starts falling.

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