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Virginia Tech Shooter Offered No Signs Of Violence

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High school friends say that Ross Ashley, 22, never hinted that he would be the type to turn to violence.
Virginia State Police
High school friends say that Ross Ashley, 22, never hinted that he would be the type to turn to violence.

Deriek Crouse, the Virginia Tech policeman murdered last week was buried Monday. More is being learned about his alleged killer, Ross Truett Ashley. The part-time university student had recently broken up with his girlfriend and had spoken about some family problems, but gave no hints of this level of violence.

In Ashleys’ hometown of Partlow, Va., former schoolmates say they're stunned. Ashley was a running back on the Spotsylvania High school football team where he graduated in 2007. Steven Hook, is a former teammate who still lives in Partlow.

"I trouble problems believing that somebody who was so nice and so personable could just turn into a killer like that -- a cold-blooded killer," says Hook.

Hook says Ashley had spoken about his plans to study business in college and do well in life, nothing Ashley said ever gave any hint that he would die at age 22, labeled by police as a suicidal killer.

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