New Mitt Romney Iowa Ad Makes Claim Newt Gingrich Can't: One Marriage | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

New Mitt Romney Iowa Ad Makes Claim Newt Gingrich Can't: One Marriage

Mitt Romney had a handy counterargument for all those who have called him a political flip flopper: his apparent steadfastness in all his personal commitments, like his 42-year marriage to his wife Anne.

Turns out, that argument can do double duty since it helps Romney draw a contrast with Newt Gingrich who is on his third marriage.

The ad uses Romney's answer from the CNBC debate when he was asked how he planned to deal his reputation for being a political chameleon.

"I think people understand that I'm a man of steadiness and constancy.

"I don't think you're going to find somebody who has more of those attributes than I do.

"I've been married to the same woman for 25 — excuse me — (chuckles) I get in trouble — for 42 years. (Laughter.) I've — I've been in the same church my entire life. I worked at one company, Bain, for 25 years, and I left that to go up and — off and help save the Olympic Games."

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Two Prominent Museum Directors Encourage 'New Ways Of Thinking'

Host Michel Martin speaks with the directors of the National Museum of African Art and the National Museum of the American Indian. Both institutions are celebrating important anniversaries this year.
NPR

The Epic 2,200-Mile Tour De France Is Also A Test Of Epic Eating

Tour de France cyclists need to eat up to 9,000 calories a day to maintain their health and weight during the race. But many teams hire chefs to elevate the meals to gourmet status.
NPR

California Nurses Union Braces For Contract Battle

The largest union of nurses in California starts contract negotiations Thursday with Kaiser Permanente's hospitals. Talks went smoothly four years ago, but this round will likely be more contentious.
NPR

A Plan To Untangle Our Digital Lives After We're Gone

In the digital age, our online accounts don't die with us. A proposed law might determine what does happen to them. But the tech industry warns the measure could threaten the privacy of the deceased.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.