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D.C. Council Approves Ethics Bill

Harry Thomas Jr. present, quiet

Harry Thomas Jr. was present for the D.C. Council's vote on the ethics bill Tuesday, but did not comment.
Patrick Madden
Harry Thomas Jr. was present for the D.C. Council's vote on the ethics bill Tuesday, but did not comment.

 

The D.C. Council has granted preliminary approval to a broad package of ethics reforms today. The bill, which was approved by a unanimous voice vote, would restrict political spending, would require more disclosure, would allow the expulsion of a councilmember who is convicted of a felony, and would create an ethics board to fine violators.

There was talk that Council member Harry Thomas Jr., whose home was raided Friday by federal agents investigating his alleged diversion of city funds for personal use, would be asked to take a leave of absence. He was, however, present and voted for the measure. He did not comment on it. 

Several amendments that would have strengthened the bill were either withdrawn or voted down. Council members pledged to work on possible changes before it comes up for a final vote in two weeks. Council Chair Kwame Brown has promised to have a completed ethics bill before the end of the year.

District voters would have to vote on certain parts of the proposal.

 

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