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    BP Accuses Halliburton Of Destroying Gulf Spill Evidence

    The complicated effort to assign blame for the worst offshore oil spill in U.S. history took another legal twist Monday when BP went to court to accuse Halliburton of "destroying damaging evidence about the quality of its cement slurry that went into drilling the oil well," The Associated Press writes.

    According to the BBC, "Halliburton denied this, saying the claims were 'without merit.' " And, the BBC adds, Halliburton "also accused BP of fraud and defamation in the investigation."

    As the AP says:

    "The allegations in the 310-page motion [from BP] ratcheted up the showdown among BP PLC and contractors, Halliburton and Transocean Ltd. The three companies have been sparring over blame for the April 2010 Deepwater Horizon blast, which killed 11 workers and led to the release of 206 million gallons of crude oil into the Gulf of Mexico. ... Also involved are Anadarko Petroleum Co. and Cameron International Corp. The first trial over the Deepwater Horizon disaster is scheduled to start Feb. 27 in New Orleans."

    In October, Anadarko announced it would pay BP $4 billion "to settle all of BP's current and future claims" against it.

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    'Purple Rain' — As Retold In A Language Without A Word For Purple

    Prince's '80s-era classic has gotten a modern update — in Niger. Directed by Christopher Kirkley, starring the nomadic Tuareg people, this Purple Rain remake drops the kissing but keeps the attitude.

    How Do We Get To Love At 'First Bite'?

    It's the season of food, and British food writer Bee Wilson has a book on how our food tastes are formed. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with her about her new book, "First Bite: How We Learn to Eat."

    Osceola At The 50-Yard Line

    The Seminole Tribe of Florida works with Florida State University to ensure it that its football team accurately presents Seminole traditions and imagery.

    Reviving Payoff For Prediction – Of Terrorism Risk

    Could an electronic market where people bet on the likelihood of attacks deter terrorism? NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Stephen Carter about the potential for a terror prediction market.

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