D.C. Public Library Offers Late Fee Amnesty | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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D.C. Public Library Offers Late Fee Amnesty

Part of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, where amnesty is being offered for fees on damaged and late items.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rock_creek/624566424/
Part of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, where amnesty is being offered for fees on damaged and late items.

D.C. library patrons with overdue books can avoid any fines and clear their library record thanks to an amnesty program beginning today.

For the next couple of months, the city's libraries will be forgiving fines on overdue books, CDs, DVDs and other materials. They'll also be clearing the records of patrons who damaged or lost things they checked out. It's not automatic -- it does require a visit to a library to speak with an employee.

D.C.'s Chief Librarian Ginnie Cooper says she hopes the effort will encourage anyone who's been avoiding the library because of lost or overdue materials to return.

Normally, late fees for books and CDs are assessed at 20 cents a day past the initial 21 days. For every day a DVD is late, you would be charged $1. There are no late fines for juvenile materials.

The amnesty program runs through February 5th.

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