A Dissolving Fruit Sticker That Claims Soap Superpowers | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

A Dissolving Fruit Sticker That Claims Soap Superpowers

Scott Amron really doesn't like peeling those little stickers off fruit from the grocery store. "They're pesky and annoying and they create waste," he tells The Salt. So, he decided to do something about it.

"I thought [the labels] could serve some sort of secondary purpose rather than being thrown away," says Amron, a New York-based designer and engineer who's best known for inventing the Brush & Rinse toothbrush. "Originally I wanted the label to help clean the fruit, and that evolved into having it dissolve."

Today, Amron's firm is preparing to roll out Fruitwash, a sticker that turns into a soap under running water. Once dissolved, the Fruitwash allegedly removes wax, pesticides, and dirt from fruit and vegetables. And while he won't reveal what the sticker is made of, Amron says it contains all "organic" ingredients.

It's a nice idea, but food safety experts say Fruitwash, or any other fruit and vegetable wash on the market, isn't that much more effective at cleaning produce than plain old water.

In 2007, researchers at the Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences at Tennessee State University tested Veggie Wash against both diluted vinegar and plain water. Sandria Godwin, the researcher who oversaw the project, told NPR at the time that, "We really did not really find the veggie washes effective or necessary."

This month The Salt checked in with Godwin, who told us that she still thinks "water works as well as anything else. It is the scrubbing that is important." But she says she likes the idea that Amron's Fruitwash sticker doesn't create extra waste.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention agrees that rinsing fresh food with water is the best way to keep it safe. Squeaky clean cutting boards and utensils will also help keep the risky bacteria at bay. And for more on which fruits and veggies need the most cleaning before eating, check out this post from our friends at Shots.

As for those pesky stickers, researchers at the Oregon State University Food Innovation Center are developing a laser labeling system that would make an imprint on the surface of the fruit.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Mary Ellen Mark And The Caged Prostitutes Of Mumbai

The photographer, who died this week, turned her lens on the marginal people of the world. One of her most acclaimed projects was her series of photos taken in the brothels of Mumbai.
NPR

Trickster Journalist Explains Why He Duped The Media On Chocolate Study

John Bohannon, the man behind a stunt that bamboozled many news organizations into publishing junk science on dieting, talks to NPR's Robert Siegel about why he carried out the scheme.
NPR

Martin O'Malley Set To Join The 2016 Race

The former Maryland governor and Baltimore mayor enters the Democratic race for president Saturday. NPR's Scott Simon talks with Juana Summers about how O'Malley will approach the campaign.
NPR

Tech Giants Compete ... For Your Vacation Albums

With ballgames, family reunions and trips to the beach, summer is full of chances to snap photos. Apple and Google are in a battle to help you store, organize and share all those visual mementos.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.