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Virginia Gets DOT Funds For Road Repairs

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The U.S. Department of Transportation is giving Virginia more than $2 million to help offset flood damage caused by Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee.
Jonathan Wilson
The U.S. Department of Transportation is giving Virginia more than $2 million to help offset flood damage caused by Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee.

Virginia is getting federal help to pay for repairing roads and bridges damaged by Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee. 

U.S. Department of Transportation Secretary Ray Lahood said today that Virginia is receiving more than $2 million from the Federal Highway Administration's emergency relief program. The funding includes more than $1.4 million to reimburse Virginia for repairing Irene-related damage and about $750,000 for repairing damage caused by Lee.

The money is to reimburse states for fixing or replacing highways, bridges and other roadway structures. Costs associated with road detours, debris removal and other immediate measures necessary to restore traffic flow after the storms are also eligible for funding. 

Virginia is among 34 states receiving funding for disaster-related road and bridge repairs. Virginia was denied broader federal disaster relief for residents and businesses by FEMA.

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