MPD Increases Patrols Around 'Occupy' Camps | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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MPD Increases Patrols Around 'Occupy' Camps

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Police speak with Occupy protesters prior to their march on Key Bridge earlier in November.
Patrick Madden
Police speak with Occupy protesters prior to their march on Key Bridge earlier in November.

U.S. Park Police say they are increasing patrols of two public squares near the White House where protesters are camping out as part of the Occupy movement.

The National Park Service handed out fliers Friday citing public urination and defecation, illegal drug and alcohol use, and assaults at the two encampments. Authorities also say improper trash disposal has led to rodent sightings.

Occupy DC participants in McPherson Square have not issued any official response to the fliers. But organizers of the Stop the Machine protest in nearby Freedom Plaza say they are treating the message as "a threat of eviction and arrest.''

Park Service spokeswoman Carol Johnson says complaints from neighbors, mostly around McPherson Square, prompted the action.

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