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Alleged White House Shooter To Get More Psych Tests

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Oscar Ramiro Ortega-Hernandez, 21, was arrested in connection with the shooting at the White House. He will be charged with attempted assassination.
U.S Park Police
Oscar Ramiro Ortega-Hernandez, 21, was arrested in connection with the shooting at the White House. He will be charged with attempted assassination.

An initial evaluation of accused White House shooter Oscar Ramiro Ortega-Hernandez found him competent to stand trial, but prosecutors filed a motion Monday asking for further psychiatric tests. 

A judge granted a defense request to delay a preliminary hearing in the case until the motion is argued.

Prosecutors say Ortega-Hernandez used an assault rifle to fire as many as 9 shots at the White House in an attempt to kill President Obama. Mr. Obama was out of town and no one was hurt, though one bullet did crack the bullet-proof glass of a second-story window outside the family's living area.

Court documents allege the Idaho native has referred to Obama as the Antichrist. His family reported him as missing Oct. 31.

Ortega-Hernandez remains in federal custody and faces charges of attempted assassination, which can carry a sentence of up to life in prison.

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